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Japanese Garden Plants
This is where to find details on plants. We don't have a lot of images, but we'll be providing articles and details as we are able. If you have materials to contribute or gaps to fill in, please let us know.

Japanese Name:kaya 
English Name:Japanese Torreya 
Latin Name:Torreya nucifera 
Family:Taxaceae 
Sub Type:EVERGREEN 
Native Habitat: 
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Last Updated:5/21/2000 
Details: This large dioecious member of the yew family is a native to central and southern Japan and is known to grow as much as 30 meters (100 feet) in height. It is an extremely hardy tree that is resistant to smog and pollution, making it a good choice for urban gardens. It responds well to pruning and can be transplanted safely even after reaching a relatively large size. It is usually propagated as a seedling or cutting but can also be grafted. Its downside is that it can look messy and disordered when it gets older.

Because of its large size, it is not a common garden plant. When it is used, the Japanese will cut the truck to half-height or else prune it heavily.

The tree has historically been used in a variety of ways, however. Its seeds produce a useful oil. This oily nature makes the wood resistant to moisture and thus a valuable material for shipbuilding and for making furo (baths). The wood is also used for making go boards.

Varieties:
var. igaensis (kotsubugaya)
var. macrospermii (hidarimakigaya)
var. radicans (chabogaya)





For further reference:
Kitamura, Fumio and Ishizu Yurio. Garden Plants in Japan. Tokyo: Kokusai Bunka Shinkokai, 1963, p. 22.

 




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