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Japanese Garden Plants
This is where to find details on plants. We don't have a lot of images, but we'll be providing articles and details as we are able. If you have materials to contribute or gaps to fill in, please let us know.

Japanese Name:maki (also inu-maki, kusa-maki, rakan-maki) 
English Name:Yew Podocarpus, Longleaf Podocarpus 
Latin Name:Podocarpus macrophyllus 
Family:Podocarpaceae 
Sub Type:EVERGREEN 
Native Habitat:deep mountains 
Light:full sun to partial shade 
Soil: 
Flower Color: 
Bloom Time: 
Width: 
Height: 
Uses: 
Last Updated:6/26/2004 
Details: This native to central and southern Japan can reach 20-25 meters (65-80 ft) in height. Its straight trunk generates lateral shoots spreading outward. The leaves are similar to that of pine but much longer and flatter with a clear midrib. They make a nice contrast in texture next to a pine. The male flowers are clusters of stubby, yellow spikes while the female are small, green and of no distinction. Both appear in late spring. The round, green seeds become ripe in October and then slowly turn black through the winter. They are edible.

The tree is not hardy against cold weather or wet soils but is good in partial shade, against pruning and in coastal (salty air) conditions. It should be planted in early spring in well-drained soil in full sun to partial shade. They can be propagated with cuttings. In gardens, it is often pruned into globular, cloud-like masses of green foliage, but do not necessarily require pruning. They are sometimes also planted in forests for lumber and as hedges in coastal regions. They are favorites not only for their character and beauty but for their unsavory flavor to deer. The wood is also moisture resistant and sometimes used in making furo (bathtubs).



Varieties:
var. maki (rakan-maki??) - Chinese podocarpus, Buddhist pine; columnar shape, red to purple fruits. Zones 8-10





For further reference:
Japanese Garden Society of Oregon. Oriental Gardening. New York: Pantheon Books, 1996, pp. 54-55.

Kitamura, Fumio and Ishizu Yurio. Garden Plants in Japan. Tokyo: Kokusai Bunka Shinkokai, 1963, p. 23.

Betty Richards and Anne Kaneko, Japanese Plants, Tokyo: Shufunotomo, 1988, p. 166-167. 




©1996-2002, Robert Cheetham; ©2017 Japanese Garden Research Network, Inc.
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