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Oyakuen
Name:Oyakuen 



 
Alternate Name: 
Kanji: 
Address: 
Mailing Address: 
City:Aizu Wakamatsu-shi 
State:Fukushima-ken 
Postal Code: 
Country:JAPAN 
Latitude/Longitude:lat=37.75; long=140.48333
Find Gardens Nearby
Phone:+81.(0)242.27.2472 
Fax: 
E-Mail: 
Contact: 
Designer(s): 
Construction Period: -  
Public/Private:PUBLIC 
Hours:Open daily, 8:30am to 5:00pm (last entrance 4:30pm) except for four days from the first Monday in July and for three days from the first Tuesday in December 
Admission:Adults: 310 yen 
Added to JGarden:1/19/2003 
Last Updated:1/19/2003 
JGarden Description:Oyakuen (lit. 'Medicine Garden') has its origin in the late 14th century, when a medicinal spring was discovered on the site. According the local sotry, the spring saved the farmers in the region from an illness that was plaguing the area. In 1440, lords of the Aizu province constructed retreats here. Beginning in 1670 the Matsudaira family began to grow various medicinal plants and grasses and in the early 1700's, ginseng began to be cultivated. It was at this time that the contemporary name became applied to the site.

In 1953, the gardens were opened to the public. Today, 400 different medicinal plants and trees are gorwn here. The gardens are arranged around a central pond, lined by thick pines and shrubs. Seasonal interest is provided by flowering cherry trees (sakura), peonies (botan), and lotuses (hasu). Tea is offered on the site as well as a traditional meal of kaiseki-ryori (reservations are required for the meal).

Oyakuen is located northeast of Tsuruga-jo Castle, off Sengoku-dori, behind the York Benimaru. 




The first winter shower;
My name shall be
"Traveller."

  Matsuo Basho
  trans. by R.H. Blyth
  17th century

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