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Admiral Nimitz Museum
URL:Goto this web site  http://www.nimitz-museum.org/ 
Name:Admiral Nimitz Museum 



 
Alternate Name:Japanese Garden of Peace, National Museum of the Pacific War 
Address:340 East Main Street 
Mailing Address:PO Box 777, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 
City:Fredericksburg 
State:Texas 
Postal Code:78624 
Country:UNITED STATES 
Latitude/Longitude:lat=30.272229; long=-98.868189
Find Gardens Nearby
Weather:current weather 
Phone:+1.830.997.4379 
Fax:+1.830.997.8220 
E-Mail: 
Contact: 
Designer(s): 
Construction Period: -  
Public/Private:PUBLIC 
Hours:Daily 10am - 5pm except Christmas 
Admission:Adults $5, Students $3, Children under 6 free. Group rates available for 20 or more. 
Added to JGarden:9/9/2001 
Last Updated:9/9/2001 
JGarden Description:The Japanese Garden of Peace was given to the people of the United States by the military leaders of Japan in honor of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz. The garden includes three basic elements: stone, plants and water. It was, in fact, designed as a replica of Admiral Togo's garden in Japan. Togo's meditation study was duplicated in Japan, disassembled and shipped to Fredericksburg, then reassembled (without nails) by the same craftsmen who built it in Japan.

The black and white stones in front of the building are supposed to represent 'balance of nature, ying, yang'. The raked gravel represents the waves in the ocean and the clumps of stone and green within the area represent the islands in the Pacific. The stream that surrounds the garden represents a single raindrop returning to the ocean. 




In the water
Under the pines on shore
Stand the friendly cranes;
A thousand and eight thousand years
Will they live on.



Ike mizu no
Migiwa no matsu no
Tomozuru wa
Chiyo ni yachiyo o
Soete sumuramu.

  Fujiwara Shigemitsu
  Kitayama-dono gyokoki
  trans. by M.V. Otake
  1408

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