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Kyoto Meditation Garden
URL:Goto this web site  http://www.omniplex.org/ 
Name:Kyoto Meditation Garden 



 
Alternate Name:Omniplex Gardens and 
Address:2100 NE 52nd Street 
Mailing Address: 
City:Oklahoma City 
State:Oklahoma 
Postal Code:73111 
Country:UNITED STATES 
Latitude/Longitude:lat=35.523987; long=-97.475331
Find Gardens Nearby
Weather:current weather 
Phone:+1.405.427.5461 
Fax: 
E-Mail: 
Contact: 
Designer(s): 
Construction Period: -  
Public/Private:PUBLIC 
Hours:Tuesday - Saturday, 9am -6pm; Sunday 11am - 6pm; closed Thanksgiving and Christmas day 
Admission: 
Added to JGarden:6/26/2001 
Last Updated:6/26/2001 
JGarden Description:Located in the Omniplex Science Center. The garden was constructed by Oklahoma's Sister State, Kyoto-hu.

A gift to Oklahoma from the perfectual government of Kyoto, Japan in celebration of their "sister-state" affiliation, the meditation garden was completed in September 1985. The garden was built by master gardeners from Kyoto Perfectual Landscape Gardening Cooperative Association, who voluntarily paid their own way to Oklahoma City to build the 1,110-square-foot garden in just three weeks. Over 30 tons of building material were brought over from Japan, including: rock, stone, tile and a 300 year-old Kasuga-style lantern. The garden was designed to show friendship and goodwill between the Kyoto Perfecture and Oklahoma City.

The foundations of the garden are the stone structure with other elements build up around these. The garden contains one grass island complete with a redbud tree, symbolizing Oklahoma, which is connected to another grass island symbolizing Kyoto by a wooden bridge which symbolizes friendship. The islands are separated by a trail of gravel which represents the ocean that separates the two. The garden also includes a waterfall (taki) and tsukubai water basin. 




The first winter shower;
My name shall be
"Traveller."

  Matsuo Basho
  trans. by R.H. Blyth
  17th century

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