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Zilker Botanical Garden
URL:Goto this web site  http://www.zilker-garden.org/ 
Name:Zilker Botanical Garden 



 
Alternate Name:Isamu Taniguchi Oriental Garden 
Address:2220 Barton Springs Road 
Mailing Address: 
City:Austin 
State:Texas 
Postal Code:78746 
Country:UNITED STATES 
Latitude/Longitude:lat=30.266088; long=-97.767914
Find Gardens Nearby
Weather:current weather 
Phone:+1.512.477.8672 
Fax: 
E-Mail: 
Contact: 
Designer(s): 
Contruction Date:1964 
Public/Private:PUBLIC 
Hours:Daily, 7am to dusk; Closed: Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year's 
Admission:No admission fee. $4 entry fee during fundraiser event the first weekend of May 
Added to JGarden:4/3/2001 
Last Updated:4/3/2001 
JGarden Description:Dedicated and opened to the public in April of 1969, this garden was a gift of appreciation to the City of Austin and the University of Texas for services extended to the creator and his family. Working without salary, contract or restrictions, Isamu Taniguchi spent 18 months transforming three acres of rugged caliche hillside into a peaceful garden. This unique garden is a delicate balance between water and plant materials, descending in a series of waterfalls, lotus ponds, and hand-made oriental lanterns, culminating in an authentic Teahouse. The honeycomb rock lining the pathways throughout the garden came from the Lake Travis area.

The Japanese Tea House, with a thatched roof over bamboo walls, provides a shady spot to pause and view the gardens. The Metal Foot Bridge crossing a small stream was one of the foot bridges used on Congress Avenue from 1870 to 1905.

 




Go to the pines if you want to learn about the pine, or to the bamboo if you want to learn about the bamboo. And in doing so, you must leave your subjective preoccupation with yourself. Otherwise you impose yourself on the object and do not learn.
  Matsuo Basho
  17th century

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