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Shinshinan
Name:Shinshinan 



 
Alternate Name: 
Address: 
Mailing Address: 
City:Kyoto-shi 
State:Kyoto-hu 
Postal Code: 
Country:JAPAN 
Latitude/Longitude:lat=35.0833; long=135.75
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Designer(s):Ogawa Jihei 
Contruction Date:late 1890's 
Public/Private:PUBLIC 
Hours: 
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Added to JGarden:1/1/1996 
Last Updated: 
JGarden Description:Shinshinan was first built as Juentei for Someya Seiichi, president of the Kanegafuchi Spinning Company shortly after Yamagata's villa was completed. Though it covers barely an acre, the garden seems much larger. Ogawa probably designed it, but the construction was overseen by his colleagues Tomokichi and Genbei. The site is topographically much more varied than at Murinan but similar techniques are employed. Water from the canal is brought in as a stream to supply the pond around which a path is arranged such that, as one walks, a sequence of views is revealed and hidden. Again woods are used to capture the view, in this case the triple gate at Nanzenji and the background of the Nanzenji Hills, Ayato Forest and the Nanzenji Bell Tower. The pine trees that form the frame and trimming line have since grown somewhat high for proper effect, but for several decades after construction, the Gate appeared to float in the air above its own shadow. More rocks were originally placed along the edge of the water but have since been removed, allowing the slope to be more clearly articulated. Matsushita Konosuke the present owner, renamed the garden Shinshinan and also added two small karesansui gardens with cryptomeria (sugi) trees rising up out of the raked white sand.




Bibliography
Itoh Teiji. Space and Illusion. Tokyo: Weatherhill, 1973, p. 40-43.

Heineken, Ty. "Gardens: Shinshin-An in Kyoto". Architectural Digest. v. 41, no. 1, Jan. 1984, p. 114-119.

 




In the distance,
Neither flowers nor maple leaves
Are to be see
Only a thatched hut beside the bay
In autumn's twilight.



Miwataseba
Hana mo momiji mo
Makari keri
Ura no tomaya no
Aki no yugure.

  Fujiwara no Sadaie
  trans. by Uehara Yukuo

©1996-2002, Robert Cheetham; ©2017 Japanese Garden Research Network, Inc.
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